8 Things I Learned From My First Webinar

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Earlier this March, I went live with my first webinar!  I debut as a Model Schools Instructor for a regional community information center where I shared some of my practices in instructional technology integration with district staff from over 14 school districts.  The webinar was called “How To Use Google Apps and Web 2.0 Tools For Formative Assessment”.  The webinar was based on my personal experiences as a middle school science teacher this school year using various tools with a 1:1 Google Chromebook program.

Attendance was high and the feedback from the course evaluations have been overwhelmingly encouraging and positive. Thank you to those who attended and took the time to answer the survey. The links to the Google Slides and Google Document are posted below.

The webinar was an exciting but daunting challenge. Sure, I’ve taken my fair share of professional development training webinars, but I haven’t been on the other side before. I didn’t realize what type and extent of preparation were needed to design and host a successful  webinar. At school, I was simply sharing my passion for instructional technology with my department team members over coffee breaks in the lounge room, showing quick 1:1 demos in my room, or sharing what I was doing with others at monthly faculty meetings.

A webinar was different. The challenge was how to transmit my passion and experiences through a computer screen to a larger group of educators I have never met before. To prepare, I decided to put together a list of things that I enjoyed about webinars I have taken as a teacher and incorporated that into my design.

4 Things I Learned About Preparing a Webinar:

  1. Begin with a question.
    • A webinar is not about the presenter. It is about the people who signed up to take that webinar. They have a reason for paying money for that webinar. Focus on that reason. Get rid of the Agenda slide and start with a simple question: “Why are you here?”
  2. Make the webinar interactive.
    • Sitting in front of a computer screen for an hour is going to be tough for viewers and you. Do not, I repeat, kill them by PowerPoint. Do use lots of fun and vivid imagery.
    • With a webinar, you can’t see or hear your audience so you need to build in multiple checks to engage and check in with your audience. Ask questions. Take polls. Luckily for me, my webinar was an introductory “smack-down” session on online tools for formative assessment!  I was able to create multiple checks where the audience experienced the tools as students.
  3. Write a script.
    • Despite the fact that I teach in front of students all day and presented a couple of times in front of very large groups, my knees still quake at the thought of speaking in front of people. I’m not very quick at forming articulate sentences; it takes me awhile to figure out what I really want to say.
    • Writing a script helped me focus on the most important ideas and say it with fewer more succinct words.
  4. Give homework.
    • Have your viewers take an active role in their learning. Ask them how they can use the information they learned in their classroom the next day. Brainstorm and share ideas.
    • Provide resources they can check out on their own. Since my webinar was an introductory session, I wasn’t able to spend more time on technical how-to’s on individual tools. Instead, I created a Google Document and linked several resources that the viewers can read on their own.

So, how well did my preparation set me up for the actual presentation? Holy moly, it was so nerve-wracking. I arrived two hours earlier at the studio and found that it was just barely enough time to prep the webinar through WebEx, which I have never used before. However, once I started talking, I quickly got the hang of it and I was shocked to see how the hour flew by so fast. I really enjoyed the process–it was so much fun! Below are some things I learned from presenting the webinar:

4 Things I Learned About Presenting A Webinar:

  1.  Improvise, improvise, improvise! 
    • Even with a script, I learned that I had to be very flexible. There were steps I had to remember on how to turn on the mic and record the webinar and some housekeeping announcements to make before I started. I also ran into problems on how to share my tools, but thankfully I was able to share the links via the Chat box and a TodaysMeet backchannel I created for the webinar. The unexpected items made me flustered and I found myself stuttering a few times. Finally, I just took a deep breath, cracked some jokes, and got on with it!
  2. You can’t control everything, so go with the flow.
    • There were audio problems with some of the viewers. (Sorry, the studio told me that as a presenter, I have nothing to do with audio!) Towards the end of the webinar, one of my add-ons didn’t work. It was frustrating, but I understood that sometimes things go wrong, especially in a live webinar. I apologized, made more jokes, and followed up with the Google Document.
    • After some research on how to improve my webinar skills, I later picked up the tip on creating and emailing viewers PDF printouts of your webinar slideshow. It gives viewers something tangible to follow along with and write notes on.
  3.  You can’t make everyone like you, so go with the flow.
    • While a majority of my reviews after the webinar were positive, I did receive one negative review. The viewer stated I was disorganized, none of my tools worked, and that my webinar was no help at all. I was CRUSHED! My mind was like a pit bull gnawing incessantly on a bone; I kept playing it over and over in my head for a couple of days. Finally, I decided to spit it out and let it go. What was one negative review among many positives? It was my first webinar after all.
    • After some reflection, I do think that in my next webinar my first poll should ask teachers where they are on the instructional technology spectrum. I would also share with the viewers a preview of the tools I was going to talk about and ask them to rate them on how familiar they are with them. While I was clear about my webinar being an introductory session,  I can customize it on the spot depending on the viewers’ feedback.
  4. Do what you love and have fun!
    • I’m thankful for the opportunity to grow as a professional educator and presenter, and to be able to share my practices and passion for instructional technology with others. It was a fun first experience, and I look forward to putting together more webinars in the summer. As we teachers like to quip, practice makes perfect!

 

Webinar Google Slides: https://goo.gl/YnYsUg

Webinar Google Document:  https://goo.gl/GU2hNH

 

Celebrating Blessings This Christmas Season

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Hello, readers! Are you still out there? One of my goals this year was to try to blog more frequently. Obviously, that didn’t pan out very well since my last post dates back to September! To be perfectly honest, I thought about scrapping this blog a few times, but each time I think I’m going to do it, I come across an inspirational post from Vicki Davis or from one of the other teacher bloggers I follow and hold off. So, here I am, brushing off the dust on this poor blog and trying again!

 

With Christmas break coming up in a few days, there’re a lot of things going on at home and in school. It’s very easy to get lost in the busy-ness, and lose sight of what matters most during Advent and Christmas season. I think this is the perfect time for me right now to reflect, celebrate and appreciate all the blessings in my personal life and career.

After making the decision to decline a high-paying position and teach at a small private school, I initially worried that I may be making a financial mistake. These past few months, however, have taught me that there’s more to a good life than money. You can make lots of money and be miserable at work, or you can wake up and actually look forward going to work because you love what you do. You can’t put a price tag on that!

The new school not only provided me with a safe place to heal emotionally but also with multiple opportunities to experiment with creating a blended science learning environment through a 1:1 Google Chromebook program and Google Apps for Education. In just a couple of months, through the use of Google Classroom and other apps, my science classroom is almost paperless! My brain is constantly buzzing every waking moment, trying to learn new things and figuring out how I can apply it in my instruction. I am very fortunate to have students who are willing to try all my experiments!

Right now I am experimenting with different apps and add-ons such as Google Forms and Flubaroo to provide more frequent formative assessment, automize grading, and provide more immediate and timely feedback to students. It is so much fun being able to marry my passion for science and educational technology in the classroom!

In January, I begin a part-time position as an educational technology specialist for a local learning center where I share what I have used as a science teacher using web 2.0 tools and Google Apps with other teachers. It’s an exciting new challenge, but the idea of doing webinars is nerve-wracking! I’ve done short flipped videos for my students before, but the thought of teaching other adults live online makes my stomach flip!

It’s a blessing to be able to come home feeling good from work, and being able to devote more time to my family at home. There’s all this buzz about emotional productivity nowadays; they tell teachers to assess the emotional mood of the classroom to boost learning. I think that administrators should also be more aware of the emotional mood of their teachers too. A little support and encouragement go a long way to creating a productive, happy, and efficient team!

 

5 #EdTech Tools I’ll Be Using This New School Year

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This year, I am very excited to be working at a school with a 1:1 Google Chromebook program. It will be a brand new adventure for me as I learn with my Grade 6 students on how to use the Chromebooks; experiment with learning management systems like Schoology for my Grades 7 and 8 students; create blended unit modules using paper interactive science notebooks and online simulations and labs; and figure out an efficient work flow with assessments and feedback.

I wasn’t able to experiment as much as I liked last year with #edtech tools, but I know right away that there are a handful I’d like to use again this upcoming school year. They worked really well for me, so I’m hoping they can be tools in my toolbox I can use again this year!

  1. Classroom Timers – Pacing is key when it comes to a good classroom. As a first year teacher, I struggled with this until someone mentioned using timers in the classroom. Now I plan out my activities and use timers to create a sense of urgency and keep my class on time so they’re set before the bell rings!
  2. Remind – With Remind, I am able to send daily text messages to parents about science homework, events and special reminders. This worked well last year because not everyone had access to email, but they all had a cell phone! Remind is web-based, so I can type up one message in the morning and send it out to different classes. We have homeroom teachers this year who will check student planners, but I think I will continue to use Remind. In fact, I’ll set up a QR sheet for Back To School Night for easy parent sign-up!
  3. ClassDojo – I rolled ClassDojo out as a behavior management system in the middle of the school year last year, and despite the late use, it worked wonderfully! Students and I had a conversation about desired behaviors and incentives and rewards for top performers in the science classroom. Students loved their “creatures” and worked hard to earn their points so they can customize them at home. They also loved seeing their points on the board while they worked in class–they worked really hard and competed with each other to earn the most points. CD also had a good communication system with parents so they too can see and keep track of their students’ behaviors and progress.
  4. DropBox – I had Dropbox account and a DropItToMe extension installed on my class wikispace. Boy did it come in very handy when my students and I worked in the computer lab! Most of the time I forgot to bring a flash drive so I could save students’ final projects, so DropBox was my lifeline. Students were able to upload their multimedia projects to me via DropBox, and I could access them instantly. With Chromebooks, I’m sure we’ll have Google Drive folders but I’d like to still have DropBox available for students in case of missed work or other projects that need to be turned in.
  5. Evernote – Evernote is like my digital notebook where I scribble everything in. I have it installed on my personal laptop, and I can sign on the website anywhere and access my notes, PDFs, receipts, etc. I’m really trying to go paperless as much as I can and Evernote allows me to do that by scanning all my papers, filing them away in Evernote, and adding multiple tags to them so I can find them again very easily. This year, I have my personal laptop, a work desktop, and a work iPad. I’m going to try to create most of my files in Google this year, but Evernote is my catch-all app so I have no doubt I’ll be using it too this year. #productivitywin

Goodbye July, Hello August!

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It’s hard to believe we’re already through the first week of August! Some young learners and fellow teachers are already back in school. I wish them all an exciting and very productive school year. In an attempt to create a more regular habit of writing, this post focuses more on my personal goals and what I’ve been working on lately.

July has been a very busy month, but I can’t say that I’m sad to see it go. In July, my school officially closed and I have been busy getting back in the job market. After seeing a career counselor, I learned that I was more interested in pursuing my interests in educational technology, but that I also was not yet done with teaching. I began to network with technology and e-learning specialists in my Twitter PLN, and they have been so helpful in answering my questions about the field.

My main goal in July was to find a new teaching position. After a long month of multiple interviews at various districts and companies, I am glad to say that I accepted an offer at a small private school as their new middle school teacher. I am excited to be part of a wonderful and supportive faith-centered learning community, and even more excited to further pursue my interests in educational technology through their growing technology program.

Other notable events in July include my week-long summer biology workshop at Cornell University (see posts one and two), my first year wedding anniversary, and my progress with Couch to 5K. In a show of support for my husband, I began to take up running to keep him company as he trained for his PT exam at work. It became a personal challenge to me (I didn’t like running), and currently I am working through Week 6! I never thought I’d be a “runner”, but it really is a wonderful feeling when you accomplish something you thought you’d never be able to do!

Made it through Week 5 of Couch to 5K (#C25K) at the time of this photo
A teacher-friend created this beautiful wedding anniversary cake for us
A teacher-friend created this beautiful wedding anniversary cake for us

For August, my main goal is to focus on purchasing our first home. My husband and I have been searching the house market on and off for the past few years. As we continue to run out of space in the apartment and focus more on growing our own food, we realize we really need to buckle down and commit to the search!

Other goals for August include spending some more family time with my boys, doing some research on 1:1 technology programs (and figuring out how I can use it in my science classroom), preparing to teach a Living Environment Regents class for the first time, setting up my science classroom, and continuing with the Couch to 5K program. Notable upcoming events include seeing one of my old middle-school friends get married this summer! My family from the West Coast will also be visiting later this month. I am so excited to see them and to spend some good quality time with family and friends.

Using Community Resources for Free (and Unconventional) Science Field Trips

My class and I had a fantastic time on our field trip three days ago… at ShopRite! Yes, going to the local grocery store for a middle school science field trip may sound strange, but it was actually an entertaining and very informative way to learn about healthy eating. Just last week, we finished our lessons on the Digestive System so we visited ShopRite as one of our culminating activities.

My class and I with the ShopRite dietitian
My class and I with the ShopRite dietitian

We met with the store’s registered dietitian, Adrian, who gave us an interactive tour of the store. The students reviewed My Plate guidelines, learned what to look for in the store when meal-planning and purchasing healthy foods on a budget, and met store managers who gave them a behind-the-scene look in the produce, bakery, and seafood aisles. They also calculated how many teaspoons of sugar were in their favorite drinks, and sampled fruit bars as an alternative healthy snack. In the picture below, some students meet one of the lobsters up close and learned about the store’s local sustainability program for seafood. We all had a great time–students, teachers, and store staff alike.

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One of my favorite parts of designing lessons and units is figuring out how to tie in local community resources in our objectives. Field trips overall are wonderful experiential learning opportunities, but local field trips are even better because they’re free, close by to our school, and connect the students to their immediate community. They are no longer learning about some intangible science concept or topic. Now they are interacting with people they see in their every day lives, making real-life connections, and also learning that these professions are something they can do too when they grow up.

Here are My Top 5 Community Resources for Science Field Trips:

1. Field Trip Factory – This website offers free experience-based field trips to participating stores and companies in your area. It even provides printable lesson plans and student handouts. Last year, I took the class on a trip to PetCo where they learned about animal adaptations and habitats on a self-guided store scavenger hunt. They were so excited when store staff brought out the reptiles for them! Grocery stores, pet stores and even retail stores usually have a community outreach department so do your research and reach out to their directors.

2. Nonprofit community organizations – Last year, as I was working on classification and the animal kingdoms, I wrote for help on a science email list serve looking for ideas for free field trips in our area. The Helderberg Workshop, a nonprofit organization dedicated to “an adventure in learning”, offered a free trip to their center where their staff could lead the students on nature walks. When the weather became too cold for outdoor hikes, they even offered to travel to our school, bring their animals, and teach the students about them! Check Idealist.org for a list of educational organizations in your area.

3. Expos – Expos are great opportunities to network with local businesses and organizations. In fact, my connection with the ShopRite dietitian came about when I stopped at the store’s vendor booth at a local health and wellness expo! Annual garden and flower expos, I’ve found, are also valuable sources of information for volunteer services and community outreach programs for many biology topics in science class!

4. Local colleges – Make a list of all the colleges by your school and do some careful digging through their websites. Most colleges, if not all, have an educational outreach or community outreach program. When SUNY’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering first opened, I came across their website and signed up for one of their NanoCareer Days. One thing led to another, and now we’re in our second year of our after school STEM Mentoring Program with them!

5. Parks, trails, and nature centers – As an avid hiker and former field biologist intern, I think students today–especially urban students–need to spend more time outside. Being outside reconnects us all with our inner child, with that sense of awe and wonder at the world around us. Many of these places offer free tours and workshops. There are even some great junior naturalist programs! Use The National Wildlife Foundation’s “Nature Finder”to search for parks, trails, and nature centers in your area. If you are in New York, use the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s Education website to find out more information about local educational centers. (Pssst! If you’re an elementary teacher, you can even request free environmental science magazines for kids for your entire class!)

Finding the Courage to Teach

I can tell that the First Day of School is drawing very near when my Facebook newsfeed starts to fill with posts from teacher-friends about sleepless nights and reoccurring nightmares. I myself have been dreaming the same nightmare for the past two or three days… I keep dreaming that I lose my cool in the middle of a class after engaging with disruptive students. I scream and yell to make myself heard, but the class just laughs at me. The weight of the humiliation and embarrassment wakes me up, and I end up tossing and turning for the rest of the night.

During my summer break, I picked up and read “The Courage to Teach” by Parker J. Palmer. The first chapter strongly resonated with me, especially the part where he talked about how good teaching is not all about technique, but rather the identity and integrity of the teacher.  Many teachers pursue this career because they are passionate about making connections. However, somewhere along the line, they become disconnected as a way to protect themselves from their nightmares.

My teaching experience last year was a lot like that. I closed myself off from my students because there was too much for me to deal with at work. I was stressed and unable to joke around, or share funny anecdotes. I tried to be more authoritarian and it made for a miserable environment for everyone. This year, I look forward to another chance to turn things around. I want to create a happier learning environment by being the person I am, and not who I think I should be.

‘Be not afraid’ does not mean that we should not have fears. Instead, it says that we do not need to be our fears. – Parker J. Palmer

As a teacher, I have a million fears. I am afraid of not being prepared, of losing things, or a lesson plan that did not go as planned. I am afraid of forgetting my schedule, or being laughed at by students, just like in my nightmares. I understand now though that this is part of being a teacher. I have to put myself out there for my students. I have to accept that I can only do my best each and every day; accept that sometimes things will not happen as planned; and try not to berate myself for the things I was unable to do. So tonight, I am going to dream good things about the year ahead. Tomorrow, my students and I will have a great First Day of School.

 

WWIDD: What Would I Do Differently?

Several days ago, Larry Ferlazzo posted on his blog: “What Are You Going To Do Differently Next Year?” I still have about a week to go before I start packing up my classroom, but his question has been rattling around in my head since I came across his post. What exactly would I do differently?

Thinking... please wait
Hmm, WWIDD?

I think a particular sentence from the book, “The Confidence Code” by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, best sums up the gist of my thoughts: Think less. Do more. Be authentic.

Here are some of my thoughts:

1. I will focus more on being in the present with my students. Sometimes as a teacher, you get inundated with so much stuff that you forget to slow down, and really think about why you’re doing it in the first place. Will a meticulously written ten-page scripted lesson plan really matter in the long run? It won’t if it means missing out on making vital connections with my students, and being able to meet them where they are, instead of pushing them along to where they’re not yet ready to be.

2. I will encourage students to take on more responsibility in the classroom. Middle-schoolers are messy; learning is messy. I have to be willing to let go of some control, and let them take over with classroom jobs to clean up the classroom, and to take over classroom routines. I can’t do everything and be everywhere at once; I need to be able to trust that they can do things safely on their own once I model for them the appropriate procedures. I also need to be patient and willing enough to guide them through it multiple times, instead of wanting to take over and do it all by myself instead.

3. I will encourage hard work, effort, and perseverance through positive praise instead of physical incentives. Not everyone in the real world gets a gold medal. I think I do my students a disservice when I’m asked to provide classroom incentives and rewards for something they’re expected to do, and for mediocrity. These rewards should be reserved for work that shows improvement, or something exceptional. I believe that it means more to students when they are able to experience the effects of hard work.  However, I am aware that I’m dealing with middle-schoolers, and they do need that little extrinsic motivation once in awhile. I’m not quite sure how I’ll revamp this next year, but I definitely will think about how to get around those incentives.

4. I will speak up more often for myself. Once caught in a very stressful situation, I found myself in tears just seconds before the bell for homeroom rang. I thought I would find guidance and assurance from a mentor, but was instead told to “not get so emotional” and “man up”. It was at that moment that I realized that as much as I love my work and its adult culture, work is work. Work does not take care of me.

I was, and still am, an introvert; the thought of having to speak up in meetings, or seek out my principal for 1:1 conferences, gives me heart palpitations. Other coworkers interrupted and spoke over me. As a result, they were seen as more competent and were offered more lucrative positions. I learned this year that I have to take care of myself. I could do that next year by letting go of my fears and hesitations, and by giving myself a stronger and louder voice.

What would you do differently?